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Postcards from the Past Series 26-29

In this series, participants will visit the past while developing an understanding of the present by comparing postcards of "Duke's Park" from the early 1900s to current views of the same location at Duke Farms. 

Written by:

barreladmin

Jan 1, 2023

Overview

In this series, participants will visit the past while developing an understanding of the present by comparing postcards of "Duke's Park" from the early 1900s to current views of the same location at Duke Farms. 

Background

James Buchanan Duke, amassing his fortune in tobacco and hydro-electric power, arrived on the banks of the Raritan River in 1893. He bought farms, mostly from early Dutch settlers, who had removed early growth while introducing many non-native plants to the area. J.B. Duke wished to emulate the European gardens and parks he encountered on his travels and desired to create his own park in Hillsborough, NJ. With manicured lawns, a variety of native and non-native plants, in addition to many structures and statues inspired by his ventures, he opened “Duke's Park” to the public in the early 1900s.

The Challenge

Over the next few weeks, we will present scenes from these early postcards of Duke Farms partnered with a current photograph of the same site.

  • Can you identify the specific differences between the view from a historic postcard and a current photo of the same area?
  • Can visitors, who have previously visited the property recognize the location? Or, if you are new to Duke Farms, we encourage you to explore our website or app for clues.  
  • If this activity inspired you to further explore how our recent initiatives improve the environment while maintaining the integrity of the past, click here
  • There are a series of questions under the pair of photos. 
  • The answers for each week will be posted under the following week.

Week 26

  1. This is a view of which major Duke Farms path?
  2. Which water source is visible in the postcard?
  3. This path intersects with what other major Duke Farms path?
  4. What other “natural feature’” is visible in both the photo and postcard?
  5. How many miles of paved and unpaved trails does Duke Farms have?

Week 27

  1.  This is a view from which gate at Duke Farms? North, South, or East?
  2. Why is this early 1900’s dirt path better for the environment than that of the present paved path?
  3. What species of trees now line many of our paths?
  4. The sign on the postcard states, “Private Property”. In what year did Duke Farms open to the public for independent explorations, hikes and discoveries?

Week 28

  1. Where is this fountain located today?
  2. What is this fountain called today?
  3. This fountain leads one onto which Duke Farms path?
  4. What statue is partially visible in the photo on the other side of this fountain?

Week 29

  1. This gate is called the “Eagle Gate”. Why?
  2. This gate and the South Gate (entrance for visitors) are located off which public road?
  3. What greets you at the far end of the Eagle Gate?
  4. The water for this fountain comes from Duke Farms only natural water resource. What is it called?

Answers

Answers to Week 26

  1. Habitat Way
  2. Duke’s Brook
  3. Central Way
  4. A rock in the foreground
  5. 18 miles

Click here to jump to Week 27

Answers to Week 27

  1. North Gate
  2. The dirt path is permeable, allowing water to seep back into soil instead of creating run-off.
  3. Pin oaks
  4. 2012

Click here to jump to Week 28

Answers to Week 28

  1. In front of the former display garden
  2. Sunken Garden
  3. Nursery Way
  4. A statue of Athena

Click here to jump to Week 29

This resource was created by Carl Cucchiara and Kate Reilly.


Written by:

barreladmin

January 1, 2023